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Ingestion of whey hydrolysate, casein, or soy protein isolate: effects on mixed muscle protein synthesis at rest and following resistance exercise in young men

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Physiology, September 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 8,404)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
217 tweeters
patent
6 patents
facebook
37 Facebook pages
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
14 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
611 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1188 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Ingestion of whey hydrolysate, casein, or soy protein isolate: effects on mixed muscle protein synthesis at rest and following resistance exercise in young men
Published in
Journal of Applied Physiology, September 2009
DOI 10.1152/japplphysiol.00076.2009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason E. Tang, Daniel R. Moore, Gregory W. Kujbida, Mark A. Tarnopolsky, Stuart M. Phillips

Abstract

This study was designed to compare the acute response of mixed muscle protein synthesis (MPS) to rapidly (i.e., whey hydrolysate and soy) and slowly (i.e., micellar casein) digested proteins both at rest and after resistance exercise. Three groups of healthy young men (n = 6 per group) performed a bout of unilateral leg resistance exercise followed by the consumption of a drink containing an equivalent content of essential amino acids (10 g) as either whey hydrolysate, micellar casein, or soy protein isolate. Mixed MPS was determined by a primed constant infusion of l-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine. Ingestion of whey protein resulted in a larger increase in blood essential amino acid, branched-chain amino acid, and leucine concentrations than either casein or soy (P < 0.05). Mixed MPS at rest (determined in the nonexercised leg) was higher with ingestion of faster proteins (whey = 0.091 +/- 0.015, soy = 0.078 +/- 0.014, casein = 0.047 +/- 0.008%/h); MPS after consumption of whey was approximately 93% greater than casein (P < 0.01) and approximately 18% greater than soy (P = 0.067). A similar result was observed after exercise (whey > soy > casein); MPS following whey consumption was approximately 122% greater than casein (P < 0.01) and 31% greater than soy (P < 0.05). MPS was also greater with soy consumption at rest (64%) and following resistance exercise (69%) compared with casein (both P < 0.01). We conclude that the feeding-induced simulation of MPS in young men is greater after whey hydrolysate or soy protein consumption than casein both at rest and after resistance exercise; moreover, despite both being fast proteins, whey hydrolysate stimulated MPS to a greater degree than soy after resistance exercise. These differences may be related to how quickly the proteins are digested (i.e., fast vs. slow) or possibly to small differences in leucine content of each protein.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 217 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 <1%
Brazil 9 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Norway 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 1159 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 254 21%
Student > Bachelor 236 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 124 10%
Researcher 109 9%
Student > Postgraduate 67 6%
Other 196 16%
Unknown 202 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 289 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 206 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 142 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 110 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 84 7%
Other 130 11%
Unknown 227 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 336. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2022.
All research outputs
#73,617
of 21,784,478 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Physiology
#31
of 8,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#279
of 143,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Physiology
#1
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,784,478 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 143,256 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.