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Body fat loss and compensatory mechanisms in response to different doses of aerobic exercise—a randomized controlled trial in overweight sedentary males

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative & Comparative Physiology, September 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 2,530)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
126 tweeters
facebook
71 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
296 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Body fat loss and compensatory mechanisms in response to different doses of aerobic exercise—a randomized controlled trial in overweight sedentary males
Published in
American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative & Comparative Physiology, September 2012
DOI 10.1152/ajpregu.00141.2012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mads Rosenkilde, Pernille Auerbach, Michala Holm Reichkendler, Thorkil Ploug, Bente Merete Stallknecht, Anders Sjödin

Abstract

The amount of weight loss induced by exercise is often disappointing. A diet-induced negative energy balance triggers compensatory mechanisms, e.g., lower metabolic rate and increased appetite. However, knowledge about potential compensatory mechanisms triggered by increased aerobic exercise is limited. A randomized controlled trial was performed in healthy, sedentary, moderately overweight young men to examine the effects of increasing doses of aerobic exercise on body composition, accumulated energy balance, and the degree of compensation. Eighteen participants were randomized to a continuous sedentary control group, 21 to a moderate-exercise (MOD; 300 kcal/day), and 22 to a high-exercise (HIGH; 600 kcal/day) group for 13 wk, corresponding to ∼30 and 60 min of daily aerobic exercise, respectively. Body weight (MOD: -3.6 kg, P < 0.001; HIGH: -2.7 kg, P = 0.01) and fat mass (MOD: -4.0 kg, P < 0.001 and HIGH: -3.8 kg, P < 0.001) decreased similarly in both exercise groups. Although the exercise-induced energy expenditure in HIGH was twice that of MOD, the resulting accumulated energy balance, calculated from changes in body composition, was not different (MOD: -39.6 Mcal, HIGH: -34.3 Mcal, not significant). Energy balance was 83% more negative than expected in MOD, while it was 20% less negative than expected in HIGH. No statistically significant changes were found in energy intake or nonexercise physical activity that could explain the different compensatory responses associated with 30 vs. 60 min of daily aerobic exercise. In conclusion, a similar body fat loss was obtained regardless of exercise dose. A moderate dose of exercise induced a markedly greater than expected negative energy balance, while a higher dose induced a small but quantifiable degree of compensation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 126 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 296 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 279 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 71 24%
Student > Bachelor 42 14%
Researcher 39 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 5%
Other 46 16%
Unknown 45 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 58 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 58 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 4%
Other 41 14%
Unknown 56 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 212. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2022.
All research outputs
#137,007
of 21,777,067 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative & Comparative Physiology
#15
of 2,530 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#574
of 144,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative & Comparative Physiology
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,777,067 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,530 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 144,521 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.