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Neuromuscular changes of the aged human hamstrings

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
45 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
Title
Neuromuscular changes of the aged human hamstrings
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, August 2018
DOI 10.1152/jn.00794.2017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric A. Kirk, Kevin J. Gilmore, Charles L. Rice

Abstract

Despite the life-long importance for posture and locomotion, neuromuscular properties of the hamstrings muscle have not been explored with adult ageing. The purpose was to assess and compare age-related effects on contractile function, spinal motor neuron output expressed as motor unit (MU) discharge rates in the hamstrings of 11 young (26 {plus minus} 4 y) and 10 old (80 {plus minus} 5 y) men. Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC), stimulated contractile properties, surface and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) from sub-maximal to MVC were recorded in the biceps femoris (BF) and semimembranosus-semitendinosus (SS) muscles. MVC torque was ~50% less in the old with both age groups attaining {greater than or equal to}93% mean voluntary activation. Evoked twitches in the old were ~50% lower in amplitude and >150% longer in duration as compared to young. At successive voluntary contractions of 25, 50 and 100% MVC, MU discharge rates were up to 45% lower in old, with no differences in relative submaximal surface EMG between age groups. Furthermore, the old had significantly lower MU discharge rates in the SS at all contraction intensities compared to the BF muscle. Men in their 8th to 10th decades of life demonstrate substantially lower strength and MU discharge rates in this functionally important large lower limb muscle group, with greater age-related effect on discharge rates in the medial hamstrings. These findings in comparison to other muscles studied highlight that the neuromuscular properties of limb muscles, and indeed within functionally similar portions of a muscle group, are not all affected equally by the ageing process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 32%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Professor 2 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 11 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 10 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2019.
All research outputs
#763,213
of 15,265,759 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#102
of 5,890 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,393
of 277,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#3
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,265,759 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,890 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.