↓ Skip to main content

American Physiological Society

Article Metrics

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of current hand amputees reveals evidence for neuronal-level changes in former sensorimotor cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 3,548)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
Title
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of current hand amputees reveals evidence for neuronal-level changes in former sensorimotor cortex
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, February 2017
DOI 10.1152/jn.00329.2016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carmen M. Cirstea, In-Young Choi, Phil Lee, Huiling Peng, Christina L Kaufman, Scott H Frey, Christina L. Kaufman, Scott H. Frey

Abstract

Deafferentation is accompanied by large-scale functional reorganization of maps in the primary sensory and motor areas of the hemisphere contralateral to injury. Animal models of deafferentation suggest a variety of cellular-level structural changes including depression of neuronal metabolism and even neuronal death. Whether similar neuronal changes contribute to patterns of reorganization within the contralateral sensorimotor cortex of chronic human amputees is uncertain. We used a functional MRI-guided proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to test the hypothesis that unilateral deafferentation is associated with lower absolute levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA, a putative marker of neuronal integrity) in the sensorimotor hand territory located contralateral to the missing hand in chronic amputees (N=19) as compared to the analogous hand territory of age/sex-matched healthy controls (N=28). We also tested whether former amputees (i.e., recipients of replanted (N=3) or transplanted (N=2) hands) exhibit NAA levels that are indistinguishable from controls, possible evidence for reversal of the effects of deafferentiation. As predicted, relative to controls, current amputees exhibited lower levels of NAA that were negatively and significantly correlated with the time after amputation. Contrary to our prediction, NAA levels in both replanted and transplanted patients fell within the range of the current amputees. We suggest that lower NAA in current amputees reflects altered neuronal integrity consequent to chronic deafferentation. Thus, local changes in NAA levels may provide a means of assessing neuroplastic changes in deafferented cortex. Results from former amputees suggest that these changes may not be readily reversible through reafferentation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Student > Master 4 18%
Researcher 4 18%
Unspecified 4 18%
Professor 3 14%
Other 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 27%
Neuroscience 5 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 9%
Engineering 2 9%
Other 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 106. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2017.
All research outputs
#94,966
of 9,065,030 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#15
of 3,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,767
of 316,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#1
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,065,030 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,548 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,411 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.